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Author Topic: Pinned, or Pinned AND Welded  (Read 2337 times)

steve2md

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Pinned, or Pinned AND Welded
« on: January 19, 2017, 06:05:46 pm »
What are the rules on taking say, a 10" upper and mounting a suppressor to it to make length so there's only 1 tax stamp involved? Is pinning alone enough? Or must one actually weld? If welding is required, is a little tack or 2 good, or do you need to actually lay a bead?
Heat it till it's hot, then beat it with a hammer until it's the shape you want.    Blacksmith's advice that works for pretty much everything in life

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    ItWasntMe

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    Re: Pinned, or Pinned AND Welded
    « Reply #1 on: January 19, 2017, 07:45:32 pm »
    I think it likely would need to be pinned and welded. Are you not concerned about welding dissimilar metals? A lot of suppressors are using titanium and aluminum.
    Have you considered the possibility that pathological narcissism is genetic?

    steve2md

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    Re: Pinned, or Pinned AND Welded
    « Reply #2 on: January 19, 2017, 08:27:32 pm »
    For the 5.56 I would use it on, the can would likely be stainless steel. Brazing would take care of the dissimilar metals issue there
    Heat it till it's hot, then beat it with a hammer until it's the shape you want.    Blacksmith's advice that works for pretty much everything in life

    drain bammage

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    Re: Pinned, or Pinned AND Welded
    « Reply #3 on: June 08, 2018, 11:09:59 pm »
    What are the rules on taking say, a 10" upper and mounting a suppressor to it to make length so there's only 1 tax stamp involved? Is pinning alone enough? Or must one actually weld? If welding is required, is a little tack or 2 good, or do you need to actually lay a bead?

    Check out the ATF National Firearms Act Handbook. On pages 5 and 6 they describe the three methods the recognize that permanently attach a device to have it count as an integral part of the barrel. Here's a direct link https://www.atf.gov/file/58251/download. Here's the search i used to find it https://www.atf.gov/resource-center/publications-library?search_api_views_fulltext=5320&field_document_type_1=All&og_group_ref=1

    "Permanent methods of attachment include full-fusion gas or electric steel-seam welding, high-temperature (1100°F) silver soldering, or blind pinning with the pin head welded over."



    Blind pinning is often the easiest to remove, but for the home gamer, silver soldering (otherwise often called brazing) might be the easiest to apply.

    steve2md

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    Re: Pinned, or Pinned AND Welded
    « Reply #4 on: June 10, 2018, 08:25:59 pm »
    Check out the ATF National Firearms Act Handbook. On pages 5 and 6 they describe the three methods the recognize that permanently attach a device to have it count as an integral part of the barrel. Here's a direct link https://www.atf.gov/file/58251/download. Here's the search i used to find it https://www.atf.gov/resource-center/publications-library?search_api_views_fulltext=5320&field_document_type_1=All&og_group_ref=1

    "Permanent methods of attachment include full-fusion gas or electric steel-seam welding, high-temperature (1100°F) silver soldering, or blind pinning with the pin head welded over."



    Blind pinning is often the easiest to remove, but for the home gamer, silver soldering (otherwise often called brazing) might be the easiest to apply.
    I think pinning and welding over the pin would likely be the least likely to damage the muzzle, so if I pull the trigger on this, that will probably be the answer. I feel like fully seam welding and silver soldering would dump too much heat into the muzzle end of the barrel (1100 degrees is only a few hundred from forging temps of most barrel steel). A pin and a quick tig button over the pin heads would do the job nicely i think.
    Heat it till it's hot, then beat it with a hammer until it's the shape you want.    Blacksmith's advice that works for pretty much everything in life

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