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Author Topic: What fixed blade knife and why  (Read 497 times)

Fahrian

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What fixed blade knife and why
« on: November 12, 2020, 05:30:01 pm »
I have been getting into gear recently, and have been putting together a battle belt. So far, I have the basics covered, but I'd like to ad a knife. I usually carry a folder in my pocket, but the belt limits accessibility to it, and with a heavier duty belt on, I think I can afford to run something more. I have seen a lot of people run push knives and karambits on their belts.

But push knives don't look like they'd be good for practical work outside of sticking someone with it, which I can appreciate, but I'd rather have a wider range of utility in a knife.

Karambits have a nice small foot print, but they extreme curve of it looks like it makes it odd to use.

Anyway, if anyone has a dedicated fixed blade knife that they would recommend, modern production or not doesn't matter, I would appreciate the suggestions.

Also, at what position do you think it's best to mount? I am a right hander, and most folks tell me to run it at my 2 o'clock, but I feel like that would get in the way

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    CMore

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #1 on: November 12, 2020, 08:18:28 pm »
     I really like the Benchmade "417 Fact® Family" it has great steel it is a one hand deployable knife that is light and lethal with a 4 inch blade. It is set up to deep carry in a pocket with the tip down so it would still be easy to get even with a belt on.  If needed I am sure you could also clip it to the belt also.  It is not a fixed blade but, many fixed blade knives are too big and bulky for tactical use. 

    https://www.benchmade.com/417-fact-family.html

    « Last Edit: November 12, 2020, 08:26:34 pm by CMore »
    K1CJM

    RJ

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #2 on: November 12, 2020, 08:22:18 pm »
    hmm nice folder fixed blade :rotfl

    CMore

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #3 on: November 12, 2020, 08:31:36 pm »
    hmm nice folder fixed blade :rotfl

    This is not a fixed blade but, all the knives he mentioned have a short blade length and are mostly a single use type of blade. 
    K1CJM

    coelacanth

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #4 on: November 12, 2020, 08:58:52 pm »
    Ok, I'll have a go at this.  Knives are very personal pieces of gear due to the way they tend to be used so it might be helpful to know what knives you currently use and are comfortable with.  You mention "push knives" and "karambits" - are you looking for a knife primarily as a last ditch self defense weapon or more of a daily use kind of tool?  How proficient are you at keeping knives in good repair and properly sharpened?   :hmm   

    A small fixed blade knife can be carried in an inverted sheath on a cord around your neck or attached to a shoulder strap of your load bearing gear or pack. Molle gear is pretty adaptable in terms of attaching stuff.   Folders with clips can be worn at the belt or clipped to a pack strap or a reinforced cargo pocket or even a boot top.   Your own personal loadout and style of use will determine the best option(s) for you.   

    Generations of people in combat and hard use environments around the world have found the general issue knives from WWII to be pretty well designed for most folks.  The MkI and MkII ( Navy designations ) or the Marine Corps fighting knife or the Army KaBar are the most frequently encountered.  I find the Navy MkI to be a pretty good all around knife for anything a pocket knife is too small for.  The bigger MkII "fighting" knife makes a good camp knife, bushwhacking kind of blade out in the boonies.  Modern reproductions of these blades are easy to come by and not terribly expensive but the sheaths are of questionable quality and usefulness.  Plain old parkerized 1095 carbon steel is hard to beat in the field and as long as you keep it well maintained it will serve you long and faithfully. 

    My own knives of that type tend to ride in the truck and the camping box as I don't need that kind of cutting power most days.  If I'm hunting or just knocking around the back country I'll usually have a folding pocket knife, a small axe or hatchet and a folding saw of some description.  I carry a Victorinox Super Tinker in my pocket, a Council Tool or Estwing cruiser axe in my hand or strapped to the pack frame and a folding saw by Bahco, Silky or Opinel in a cargo pocket or pack pocket. 

    Big chopping blades exact too much of a weight penalty for their limited utility in most situations - IMO.  They're generally too big for use on game, too awkward to chop with for any length of time and take a long time to resharpen when you dull them.  An axe or hatchet is a superior chopper and a smaller knife with a thinner blade is a superior cutter and a saw is way more precise and energy efficient when harvesting wood or quartering game animals.  If you need to defend yourself with a blade - lets just say your situational awareness and tactics need work.   :whistle   That said, I wouldn't want to tangle with somebody skilled in the use of a Bowie knife and a tomahawk.  Nasty pair of cutters in a fight. 

    Brands I have learned to respect as working tools are ESEE, Tops, Ontario, Becker Knife and Tool, Habilis Bushtool, Council Tool, Estwing, J. Martiini, Bahco, Silky, Opinel and a few others.   Online dealers I have come to trust for good service are Knives Ship Free and Baryonyx Knife Company. 

    Those are production line products and won't generally break the bank.  If you want to talk high end, semi-custom and custom made stuff let me know as I have a few recommendations there as well.  Hope this was helpful.   



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    Fahrian

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #5 on: November 12, 2020, 09:27:08 pm »
    hmm nice folder fixed blade :rotfl

    it's just one bubba'd weld from being a fixed blade

    GTGallop

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #6 on: November 12, 2020, 09:34:23 pm »
    I recently read in the ARS that a knife less than 3" is not considered a weapon.  By omission one could assume that one over 3" is?
    I'm letting that guide me in my purchases for a blade from here on out.
    The only thing that separates man from animal is our affinity for toilet paper.
    Once we, as a society, lose that affinity, we begin to descend back into the animal kingdom, and after three or more days you will find the food chain beginning to invert on itself.

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    Fahrian

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #7 on: November 12, 2020, 09:41:43 pm »
    I mention the karambits and push knives, because they are usually recommended when I ask for a good duty belt knife, and I suspect people recommend them because they have a small footprint and don't take up much space.

    To be a little more specific, I would intend to use the knife for basic fieldwork and bushcraft, so neither a push knife nor crambit would suit me, but I also don't need a massive bowie knife.

    For years, the two knives I have carried the most are a bowie knife, mainly when hunting and out camping, and a fairbairn sykes V2 in my boot. But I only need the bowie for lopping off rattler heads and skinning yotes, I know it's bulky, but it gets through the limbs, sorry if tmi, and the V2 isn't exactly a work knife.

    While I am no exception from getting in over my head and thinking I am a tough guy from time to time, I do not intent to use this as my first line of defense in a fight, as I know I am not a knife fighting champion. I whole heartedly agree with your statement that "If you need to defend yourself with a blade - lets just say your situational awareness and tactics need work."

    I am a bit wet behind the ears, especially with knives, and I am just now taking a look at the Marine Fighting Knives, specifically the M3, but the Western 46-8 and the Mark 1 is catching my eye as well. I can see what you mean when you say higher quality sheaths may be an issue, and I may just make one out of kydex.

    Thank you for the recommendation

    and even though it isn't a fixed blade, I will take a look at the Benchmade "417 Fact® Family" for pocket carry



    Fahrian

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #8 on: November 12, 2020, 09:42:47 pm »
    I recently read in the ARS that a knife less than 3" is not considered a weapon.  By omission one could assume that one over 3" is?
    I'm letting that guide me in my purchases for a blade from here on out.

    not a bad policy, but I am putting this knife on my gun belt, so I not worried about it

    but I will keep it in mind when picking up a good pocket knife

    Rusty Young Man

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #9 on: November 13, 2020, 12:20:53 am »
    I have been getting into gear recently, and have been putting together a battle belt. So far, I have the basics covered, but I'd like to ad a knife. I usually carry a folder in my pocket, but the belt limits accessibility to it, and with a heavier duty belt on, I think I can afford to run something more. I have seen a lot of people run push knives and karambits on their belts.

    But push knives don't look like they'd be good for practical work outside of sticking someone with it, which I can appreciate, but I'd rather have a wider range of utility in a knife.

    Karambits have a nice small foot print, but they extreme curve of it looks like it makes it odd to use.

    Anyway, if anyone has a dedicated fixed blade knife that they would recommend, modern production or not doesn't matter, I would appreciate the suggestions.

    Also, at what position do you think it's best to mount? I am a right hander, and most folks tell me to run it at my 2 o'clock, but I feel like that would get in the way

    If you're looking for a decent utility knife that won't break the bank, can be modified to enhance bushcraft use, is available in carbon or stainless, and has a great reputation, consider a Morakniv.

    Here's some offerings on Amazon. Some models are in the $10 range, some go for more than $100. Good grip makes it comfortable for arthritic or weaker hands, functional sheath, and a decent kitchen knife.

    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=Morakniv

    Heck, you could buy a few and keep them in your camping, EDC, or fishing gear.

    That's if you want utility over "fighting" use.

    For more combat or CQC offerings, Cold Steel also has a wode selection of affordable blades with good reputation.
    « Last Edit: November 13, 2020, 12:23:50 am by Rusty Young Man »
    “Life, liberty, and property do not exist because men have made laws. On the contrary, it was the fact that life, liberty, and property existed beforehand that caused men to make laws in the first place.”-- Frederic Bastiat

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    RJ

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #10 on: November 13, 2020, 05:12:23 am »
    If you're looking for a decent utility knife that won't break the bank, can be modified to enhance bushcraft use, is available in carbon or stainless, and has a great reputation, consider a Morakniv.

    Here's some offerings on Amazon. Some models are in the $10 range, some go for more than $100. Good grip makes it comfortable for arthritic or weaker hands, functional sheath, and a decent kitchen knife.

    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=Morakniv

    Heck, you could buy a few and keep them in your camping, EDC, or fishing gear.

    I've carried one of these for a decade or two, and did into city of phoenix, town h all, till the new security got set up, now you can't even get in with a fingernail file,
    and have had a run in with one guard about my hearing aides and or my phone ear piece. Was not purdy, as noted a lot of places have enacted security where you cannot even carry in a small pocket knife on key chain. absolutely stupid if you ask me.

    The morakniv is an awesome blade, and comes in so many different styles and when it comes to the point its looking ragged it gets relegated to some other chore, ie' fishing box, tool box ect.
    damm good blade for sure.
    rj

    That's if you want utility over "fighting" use.

    For more combat or CQC offerings, Cold Steel also has a wode selection of affordable blades with good reputation.

    GTGallop

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #11 on: November 13, 2020, 06:16:20 am »
    If I was buying today...
    https://www.gerbergear.com/en-us/product-customization-page?productId=30-001038

    And I would pay the extra to have my name put on it.  Keeps sticky fingers from getting interested.
    The only thing that separates man from animal is our affinity for toilet paper.
    Once we, as a society, lose that affinity, we begin to descend back into the animal kingdom, and after three or more days you will find the food chain beginning to invert on itself.

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    RJ

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #12 on: November 13, 2020, 06:51:17 am »
    If I was buying today...
    https://www.gerbergear.com/en-us/product-customization-page?productId=30-001038

    And I would pay the extra to have my name put on it.  Keeps sticky fingers from getting interested.

    lol, imo not a good idea for names on a defensive weapon, might have to leave it if stuck in a bone or something, or lost in a moment.

    and the only one who wins in a knife fight is the first one to the ER, just saying
    Rj

    thom

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #13 on: November 13, 2020, 07:09:25 am »
    Have you looked at the Spyderco knives?  They have a few models that salt won't affect them.

    Thom
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    FreeInAZ

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #14 on: November 13, 2020, 01:21:07 pm »
    This is kind of like asking what kind of under wear & why? In other words, what works & is comfortable for one person may not be close to that for another aka "Tighty whities" vs "Silk boxers" etc.  So go to a gun & knife show or find a place that has more than a few & handle as many as you can to see what works for you. Mora makes excellent blades & so do many others & just like with anything, you often pay for a name versus actual function vs price.... if you're hell bent on spending money ESSE & Bark river make good blades I'm told.

    https://eseeknives.com/

    https://barkriverknives.com/

    Edit to add - since you're talking about a "battle belt" that brings in all sorts of considerations: weight, cost, purpose in this case fighting ... fighting knives are like guns, in which the more distance they can allow you from the other human trying to kill you, typically the better off you are... this is one of my favorite "beater do all blades" & yes I can fight with it if need be: Cheap, stealthy & capable lopping things off in a pinch or going through most "stuff"... 
    « Last Edit: November 13, 2020, 01:46:31 pm by FreeInAZ »
    Better to die on our feet than live on our knees! "The art of war teaches us to rely not on the likelihood of the enemy's not coming, but on our own readiness to receive him; not on the chance of his not attacking, but rather on the fact that we have made our position unassailable." -Sun Tzu

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #15 on: November 13, 2020, 01:27:24 pm »
    Esee makes good fixed blades, and are relatively affordable considering they are 1095 carbon steel.  I’ve carried an Izula in a kydex sheath behind my belt buckle for several years, and have the 4 in my get home bag. 

    They make a variety of designs, I’m sure one should suit your needs.
    https://eseeknives.com/product-category/esee-knives-0
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    RetroG

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #16 on: November 13, 2020, 01:29:50 pm »
    For a fixed blade, I have no suggestions, as my preferred local knife maker has gone far away from what I like (his kids took over).

    As to where I carry a fixed blade, being right handed I carry it on my left side kind of angled like a cross draw.  And yes, I had to get a custom kydex sheath made because the sheath that came with it was of no practical value.

    FreeInAZ

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #17 on: November 13, 2020, 02:06:58 pm »
    I recently read in the ARS that a knife less than 3" is not considered a weapon.  By omission one could assume that one over 3" is?
    I'm letting that guide me in my purchases for a blade from here on out.

    Thankfully you live in AZ...which unlike most states has knife preemption. Huh? You say, so? This means all the little wanna be commie cities cannot enforce laws (ordinances) stricter than state law, & thankfully AZ is a very free state when it comes to blades. I'd like to think it is because while not all folks can afford a gun, ammo, range time... most can afford $20 for a machete, one hell of a defensive blade in most peoples hands.

    ETA - In that crap-tastic looking blade/sheath I have less than $20 including the grip wrap, para-cord, and the length of ABS pipe I melted into a sheath & the vinegar I used to patina the blade. In the end I got a quiet (no rattle) sheath & a fast, light blade, that holds an edge & is quick & easy to sharpen, & can do most things needed of a "fighting blade"... yep, it ain't pretty, but I doubt if it is ever needed for anything other than brush/spiked branch clearing during my trail walks(?) I'll be sticking around to field fashion complaints...as always..do what works for you & F what all the posers say. :) 

    P.S. I do own some higher end big knives, and while they are cool x10, they are heavy, hard to sharpen, and have leather sheaths that don't hold up so well in the rough & tumble of the desert & it's foot hills. Like all things in life, choosing a fixed blade "fighting knife" is a balancing act in my experiences.
    « Last Edit: November 13, 2020, 02:50:55 pm by FreeInAZ »
    Better to die on our feet than live on our knees! "The art of war teaches us to rely not on the likelihood of the enemy's not coming, but on our own readiness to receive him; not on the chance of his not attacking, but rather on the fact that we have made our position unassailable." -Sun Tzu

    Clifffalling

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #18 on: November 13, 2020, 05:57:25 pm »
    First one is an Elkins. Very light fast.
    Second one,  sorry, custom. Planer blade, blade and micarta handle.  Insanely sharp, will cut skin with the slightest movement, very stout, can pry open joints with it. High carbide so rust can be an issue, but balanced well so it isnt brittle. Thats my baby.
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    coelacanth

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #19 on: November 13, 2020, 10:11:46 pm »
    I mention the karambits and push knives, because they are usually recommended when I ask for a good duty belt knife, and I suspect people recommend them because they have a small footprint and don't take up much space.

    To be a little more specific, I would intend to use the knife for basic fieldwork and bushcraft, so neither a push knife nor crambit would suit me, but I also don't need a massive bowie knife.

    For years, the two knives I have carried the most are a bowie knife, mainly when hunting and out camping, and a fairbairn sykes V2 in my boot. But I only need the bowie for lopping off rattler heads and skinning yotes, I know it's bulky, but it gets through the limbs, sorry if tmi, and the V2 isn't exactly a work knife.

    While I am no exception from getting in over my head and thinking I am a tough guy from time to time, I do not intent to use this as my first line of defense in a fight, as I know I am not a knife fighting champion. I whole heartedly agree with your statement that "If you need to defend yourself with a blade - lets just say your situational awareness and tactics need work."

    I am a bit wet behind the ears, especially with knives, and I am just now taking a look at the Marine Fighting Knives, specifically the M3, but the Western 46-8 and the Mark 1 is catching my eye as well. I can see what you mean when you say higher quality sheaths may be an issue, and I may just make one out of kydex.

    Thank you for the recommendation

    and even though it isn't a fixed blade, I will take a look at the Benchmade "417 Fact® Family" for pocket carry
    The Western 46-8 is well designed for a big knife.  The blade is well balanced and the handle is comfortable - which can be the downfall of many otherwise well designed knives.  I had one for years that lived in the camping box and always went out into the field with me.  It got a little beat up - particularly the aluminum pommel but served me well.  It still serves my son well as it lives with him these days.  The factory sheath was a light duty affair and I finally had a custom sheath made that would stand up to hard use and tough conditions.  The steel was OK - about on par with with the Ontarios and KaBars of the day.  I actually liked the older version of it with the stacked leather handle but every one I ever found had begun to rust underneath that leather - no bueno.   :smh

    The Buck Frontiersman 124 is a brute of a knife and also comfortable if you have larger than average hands.  The factory sheath is decent and they absolutely refuse to rust although you pay for that with reduced edge performance compared to carbon steel knives. 

    A word or two about steel:  If money is no object you can always have the latest vacuum melted, particle metallurgy wonder steel that will still shave a dry frog after cutting through a mile and a half of carpet remnants and can be re-sharpened with only a pass or two on a steel - at least that's what the sales literature says.  In the real world the trade-offs are edge holding, ease of sharpening and corrosion resistance.  Sometimes you can get most of two of those characteristics in one knife - if you're lucky.  Usually you're holding a knife that does one of those things really well and kind of stinks at the other two. 

    Its hard to beat carbon steel - properly made - in terms of performance.  Tool steels give slightly different performance parameters depending on the type selected but they are very popular for a reason.  Again, they have to be properly made.   I have owned and used knives, large and small, made with the following steels and when done properly they are all good to go for hard use blades.   

    W1, O2, 1095, 1075, A2, D2, L6, 154CM, 52100, 420, 440C, AUS8, AUS10, VG10

    I prefer natural handle materials like wood and/or leather, bone and horn but find stabilized wood and micarta to be the best of the synthetic materials for me.  The main thing in a handle is that it be comfortable to work with for more than just a few minutes and that it is able to be indexed in your hand ( either hand ) in the dark when wearing gloves and that it has a provision for attaching a lanyard.   Sheaths need to be something more than decorative bits.  If a sheath does not protect the knife inside it and the person wearing it from the knife inside it I have no use for it.  If your knife and sheath cannot survive a fall from horseback or a slide down a rocky slope it isn't doing its job.  If the knife can be made to poke through the sheath or pop out of the sheath "accidentally" its a danger to the person carrying it.  Ask me how I know.   :facepalm

    Based on all that I've said so far in this thread you might conclude that a lot of my knives are decidedly "old school".  You would be correct.   I take my cues and clues from those who work with these tools all day, every day.  They won't use something that doesn't work well and given the choice, neither will I. 
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    JT

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    Re: What fixed blade knife and why
    « Reply #20 on: November 21, 2020, 01:21:30 pm »
    I will 2nd the check out the Morakniv. Several reasonably priced available on Amazon. Stainless or carbon. I prefer the carbon. Not as highly finished as more expensive knives but good quality. I have several as they are cheap enough to put into multiple bags. If you need a combat knife, it is hard to beat the Kabar military knives. The Glock knives will also work at half the price. If you need a chopper get a hatchet, axe, machete or kukri. The Old Hickory line of kitchen knives are inexpensive, very tough and a lot of people convert them to utility knives.
    « Last Edit: November 21, 2020, 01:29:01 pm by JT »

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