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Author Topic: SOLD 45 Long Colt Brass  (Read 409 times)

firewater forge

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SOLD 45 Long Colt Brass
« on: September 17, 2021, 08:15:56 pm »
One bag of 100 new brass and a bag that looks like 150 to 200 once fired brass.
$60.00 for all.
Will ship U.S. mail in the conus for $16.00 more.
PM Me.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2021, 10:22:57 am by firewater forge »
"So prove yourselves cautious as serpents and yet innocent as doves"- Matthew 10:16 (second half)

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    Brian10x

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    Re: WTS 45 Long Colt Brass
    « Reply #1 on: September 21, 2021, 03:02:21 pm »
    Is there actually a SHORT Colt?

     :hmm

    firewater forge

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    Re: WTS 45 Long Colt Brass
    « Reply #2 on: September 21, 2021, 08:45:29 pm »
    An excerpt:
    "While it is sometimes referred to as .45 Long Colt or .45 LC, to differentiate it from the very popular .45 ACP, and historically, the shorter .45 S&W Schofield, this was originally an unofficial designation by Army quartermasters. Current catalog listings of compatible handguns list the caliber as .45 LC and .45 Colt. Both the Schofield and the .45 Colt were used by the Army at the same period of time prior to the adoption of the M1882 Government version of the .45 Schofield cartridge."

    So, yes.  :glare
    "So prove yourselves cautious as serpents and yet innocent as doves"- Matthew 10:16 (second half)

    coelacanth

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    Re: WTS 45 Long Colt Brass
    « Reply #3 on: September 22, 2021, 02:45:18 pm »
    The term "short Colt" is more often associated with the .38 caliber cartridge that bears that designation.  Because that term was frequently used by shooters and gun writers of the day ( early 20th century ) it somehow morphed into a term used when referring to the .45 caliber rounds. 

    The Schofield revolver of 1870 was chambered for the .45 Smith & Wesson which became known as the .45 Schofield in the No. 3 Schofield revolvers.  Many consider(ed) it a superior round to the .45 Colt but it fell out of favor with the Army due to the huge stocks of .45 Colt ammunition and weapons it had already purchased.  They eventually quit issuing the Schofield revolvers and the rest is history. 

    That's a decent price for the brass IMO - good luck with the sale.   :thumbup

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